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This is commercial season for what they call Market Squid, small squid that only live a year or so. Last night at dusk, the ocean off Mile 202/203 lit up with squid boat lights. The lights attract the squid, then the boats deploy their nets around the squid. Just a half hour after I took the attached photo, all of the boat lights had been extinguished, probably because the boats had all deployed their nets. Six years ago, there was zero harvest of squid in Oregon. Now the commercial catch brings in millions of pounds a year, with the ocean offshore from Waldport being a hot spot of activity on the central coast. The warming ocean is good for calamari lovers, but unfortunately not so good for salmon.

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All Mile 202 Reports

Showing 8 of 59 reports

Mile 202

January 28, 2024

After finding forty beached Cassin's Auklets on Jan.

Jon French

Mile 202

October 30, 2023

A beautifully calm, sunny day, maybe the last for awhile, with a fifteen mile view from Seal Rock to Cape Perpetua and hardly anyone on the beach except for two surf fishers and a couple valiantly trying to launch a kite with no wind.

Jon French

Mile 202

August 30, 2023

As I began yesterday's mile walk and monthly COASST beached bird survey, a light rain began to fall, the first in months.

Jon French

Mile 202

July 23, 2023

As I have done before, I combined today's walk with my monthly COASST survey for dead seabirds.

Jon French

Mile 202

May 16, 2023

The beach was fairly cool today after 99 degrees two days ago.

Jon French

Mile 202

March 14, 2023

This was my second monthly beached bird survey for COASST (Coastal Observation And Seabird Survey Team) which I combined with my mile walk.

Jon French

Mile 202

February 23, 2023

A dead certacean was reported to the Oregon Marine Mammal Stranding Network to be on the beach in Bayshore Oregon by Beach Entrance 67d.

JLcoasties

Mile 202

February 15, 2023

Today's walk included my first COASST (Coastal Observation And Seabird Survey Team) survey for beached birds.

Jon French