Report Details

As I have done before, I combined today's walk with my monthly COASST survey for dead seabirds. My wife, Trish, walked the wet sand while I surveyed higher on the beach. We found and identified two intact, freshly dead Common Murres, one on the wet sand and a second carcass which Trish pulled from the water. As we finished recording our data, a man came up and said a similar bird with a broken leg was struggling in the surf to the north. As I approached that scene, I saw two boys were trying to reach the distressed bird, one boy in water up to his waist. By the time I got to the boys, they had given up, saying they had wanted to rescue the bird and call someone. I explained that the Oregon Coast Aquarium probably wouldn't be able to accept this bird for rehabilitation, Common Murres being the most common seabird that washes ashore, and that as hard as it was to watch, sometimes we had to let nature take its course.Although this was the first day I found more than one beached bird, that morning I had read an OPB article and listened to an interview with COASST's founder, Julia Parrish (link below), publicizing her and her associates' new research showing that, based on long term data collected by COASST volunteers, increasingly common mass mortality events of seabirds caused by warming ocean waters and consequent less abundant prey actually results in periods of post-event depressed carcass encounters, portending with continuing climate change an eventual reduction in carrying capacity for seabirds on the West Coast.https://www.opb.org/article/2023/07/23/seabirds-climate-change-die-off/

Conditions

Temperature: 58 F. Cloud Cover: Sunny. Tide Level: 0.8 feet.

Human Activities

Number of people: 14. Number of dogs: 4. Walking or running: 6. Playing in sand: 2. Sitting: 4. Other Activities: Two boys were trying to rescue a distressed Common Murre in the surf (see Summary).

Notable Wildlife

See Summary regarding a distressed Common Murre. Last year at this time, there were Western Snowy Plover roped nest enclosures, adults, and chicks on Mile 202, but there are none to be seen now, some plover tracks but no birds, nests, or nest enclosures.

Beached Birds

Total dead birds: 2. Two intact, freshly dead Common Murres which I processed and reported to COASST. During my previous month's beached bird survey, I had found only a wing, which COASST considers a beached bird but which I was unable to identify. The COASST experts were subsequently able to identify the wing as a Surf Scoter.

Driftline Content

Small rocks, Shells, Animal casings (e.g., crab, shrimp molt), Wood pieces. Very patchy driftline, spread over a large area of mid-beach.

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All Mile 202 Reports

Showing 8 of 59 reports

Mile 202

January 28, 2024

After finding forty beached Cassin's Auklets on Jan.

Jon French

Mile 202

October 30, 2023

A beautifully calm, sunny day, maybe the last for awhile, with a fifteen mile view from Seal Rock to Cape Perpetua and hardly anyone on the beach except for two surf fishers and a couple valiantly trying to launch a kite with no wind.

Jon French

Mile 202

August 30, 2023

As I began yesterday's mile walk and monthly COASST beached bird survey, a light rain began to fall, the first in months.

Jon French

Mile 202

July 23, 2023

As I have done before, I combined today's walk with my monthly COASST survey for dead seabirds.

Jon French

Mile 202

May 16, 2023

The beach was fairly cool today after 99 degrees two days ago.

Jon French

Mile 202

March 14, 2023

This was my second monthly beached bird survey for COASST (Coastal Observation And Seabird Survey Team) which I combined with my mile walk.

Jon French

Mile 202

February 23, 2023

A dead certacean was reported to the Oregon Marine Mammal Stranding Network to be on the beach in Bayshore Oregon by Beach Entrance 67d.

JLcoasties

Mile 202

February 15, 2023

Today's walk included my first COASST (Coastal Observation And Seabird Survey Team) survey for beached birds.

Jon French