Report Details

Twenty-five species of kelp/algae, clumps of surfgrass, small rocks, Leather Bryozoa, Hydrozoa, Sea pork tunicates, Stylea (Stalked Tunicate), one Cryptochiton, Sponges, jellies, one empty skate eggcase in driftline. Four dead Common Murre, two eaten by a raptor. Owl pellet with small bird bones on Crook Point. Forty Harbor Seals resting on rocks or swimming in bay. Two Black Oystercatchers and Double-crested Cormorants on off-shore rocks. Tracks of deer, river otter, fox, raccoon, coyote and Harbor Seal on beach. Low-flying paraglider over beach and headland. (Reported to State Parks and USFW.) Sand removed from south beach exposing large rocks. Sand accumulation on middle beach covering cobble patches. Run-off from headlands washed sand out of gullies. Driftlogs piled up at south end of mile. Air and ocean tembertures of 62 and 55.4 F, respectively. No wind.

Conditions

Temperature: 62 F.

Human Activities

Number of people: 1. Other Activities: Flying paraglider, low over beach. We heard a loud sound like a motorcycle at 12:19 pm and looked up and saw a paraglider coming directly towards us from the northwest. I started taking pictures, but as he got closer, it looked like he was going to run into us or crash. He was flying very low, only three or four feet above the sand, and he did not change his course away from us as he got closer to us. We were concerned that we were going to be hit or he was going to crash his paraglider and moved quickly to avoid being in an accident. Then we turned and watched him fly around some rocks. He continued to fly southeast down the beach so low that it appeared that he was going to land on the beach, but his parasail continued to be full. Then he went around the south rocky point and disappeared. He quickly reappeared up higher in the sky and flew up over the south point flying northwest towards us. He continued towards us at the surf edge and was still very low. He passed us and then continued northwest but then turned inland or to the north and disappeared. However, we still could hear the engine. Then we saw him coming back towards us above the refuge. He swung down over the beach again, barely missing the tree tops and flew back up over the refuge and then repeated that same pattern. Then he flew northwest between Saddle Rock and Crook Point over the water. Our last picture was taken at 12:25 pm.

Concerns

Apparent violations: Low flying paraglider.

Notable Wildlife

2 Black Oystercatchers, Double-crested Cormorants, 40 Harbor Seals resting on rocks and swimming in bay. Tracks of deer, River Otter, raccoon, coyote, fox and Harbor Seal on the beach. Large Bumble bee on Sea Rocket plant.

Beached Birds

Total dead birds: 4. 4 Common Murre Two dead Common Murre appeared to have been eaten by a raptor (possible Peregrine by the foot print size). Owl pellet with small bird bones found on Crook Point headland.

Driftline Content

Seaweeds and seagrass, Small rocks, Wood pieces. See General Comment

Natural Changes

See General Comment.

Actions & Comments

Reported low-flying paraglider to State Parks and USFW. Recent erosion: Heavy rains washed out sand from gullies. Sand removed from south beach exposing large rocks. Sand accumulation on middle beach covering cobble patches. Large amount of drift logs at south end of mile.Driftline content: Empty Raja binoculata (Big Skate)egg case, Leather Bryozoan (Flustrellidra), Hydrozoa, Sea Pork (Aplidium), Sponges (Clathria), Moon Jellies (Aurelia species), Stalked Tunicate (Steyla), Gum-boot Chiton (Cryptochiton stelleri), one auto tire, clumps of surf grass (Phyllospadix), Postelsia palmaeformis (Sea Palm), Fucus (Rockweed), Egregia (Feather Boa Kelp), Nereocystis (Bull Kelp), Cryptopleura (Ruffled Red Seaweed), Pterygophora (Old Growth Kelp), Hymenena (Black-lined Red Seaweed), Ahnfeltia (Wiry Forked Seaweed), Rhodymenia (Pacific Rose Seaweed), Cryptosiphonia (Dark Branching-tube Seaweed), Mazzaella (Iridescent Seaweed), Cystoseira (Northern Bladder Chain), Callophyllis (Beautiful Leaf Seaweed), Ptilota (Sea Fern), Saccharina (Sea Cabbage), Alaria (Ribbon Kelp), Lessoniopsis (Strap Kelp), Constantinea (Cup and Saucer Seaweed), Osmundea (Sea Laurel), Opuntiella (Prickly Pear Seaweed), Mastocarpus papillatus (Turkish Washcloth), Kallymeniopsis, Serraticardia, and Pelvetiopsis limitata (Little Rockweed).

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All Mile 20 Reports

Showing 8 of 35 reports

Mile 20

January 13, 2015

One person and two dogs were seen on the beach.

D Bilderback

decorative elemnt for a coastwatch report.

Mile 20

May 15, 2013

Except for one small heavy patch of drift, the driftline was sparse with kelp/algae, Leather Bryozoa and crab carapaces.

D Bilderback

Mile 20

March 8, 2013

The driftline was absent except for two localized areas with terrestrial-derived leaves, mosses, wood pieces, some shredded blades of Pterygophora(Old Growth Kelp) and a few invertebrates and other algae and kelp.

D Bilderback

Mile 20

December 9, 2012

Peregrine Falcon resting on south end of Saddle Rock.

D Bilderback

Mile 20

May 17, 2012

Light driftline with 12 different genera of kelp and algae, terrestrial mosses, Leather Bryozoa (Flustrellidra corniculata), the flowering plant, Phyllospadix (Seagrass) and small rocks.

D Bilderback

Mile 20

September 7, 2011

Three boats seen drifting very close to offshore rocks.

D Bilderback

Mile 20

July 28, 2011

The south beach lacked driftline and sand has accumulated around the drift logs and over the large rocks at the base of the headland.

D Bilderback

Mile 20

May 17, 2011

The driftline was light on the southern and northern portions of the beach but heavy on the middle portion of the beach with large amounts of kelp/algae and forest duff.

D Bilderback