Invasive Species Articles

Derelict Japanese fishing vessel, debris from the tsunami, on Arcadia Beach.\Photo by Tiffany Boothe, Seaside Aquarium.

CoastWatcher-Aided Tsunami Debris Research Published

japanese_fishing_boat_arcadia_beach_12-2-17_tiffany_boothe.jpg On Dec. 2, a derelict 38-foot Japanese fishing boat, debris from the 2011 tsunami that devastated Japan, washed up on Arcadia Beach south of Cannon Beach. Six years after the earthquake and tsunami on the other side of the Pacific, we’re still receiving...Read more
Sea pickles off the coast of Oregon.

Sightings: ‘Sea Pickles’ Wash Ashore in the Pacific Northwest

pyrosomes Mysterious translucent creatures are washing ashore along the western shores of North America. Known as “sea pickles” -- the scientific name is pyrosomes -- these creatures are made up of a colony of individual zooids. A zooid is a tiny multicellular organism that makes up part of a colonial animal, and can develop from another zooid by budding or...Read more
Waldport High School, scene of the Sharing the Coast Conference.  Photo by Sara Schreiber.

'Sharing the Coast' Takes Place this Weekend

waldport_h.s._2_sara_schreiber.jpg CoastWatch’s Sharing the Coast Conference, our 9th annual feast of information about shoreline natural history and science, takes place this year in Waldport, and is coming up this weekend, March 3-5. The public is invited, so please spread the word to anyone you know who might be interested. However, the...Read more
Photo of Horsfall Beach by Dina Pavlis.

Strategy Group Creating Dunes Restoration Plan

Horsfall Beach at the southern end of the Oregon Dunes. Photo by Dina Pavlis. The Oregon Dunes, the longest stretch of coastal dunes in the United States, is a dynamic landscape. Their dynamism depends on moving sand. The introduction of non-native species, especially the highly invasive European beachgrass, has created a severe threat to the dunes, through...Read more
Coos Bay entrance--invasive organisms in ballast water keep out!  Photo by Alex Derr.

State Will Take Public’s Views about Ballast on Board

coos_bay_entrance_by_alex_derr.jpg Oregon Shores played an active role in advocating for the state’s original regulation of ballast water back in the ‘90s, so we feel a certain proprietary interest in how these protections are administered. Water drawn on board to serve as ballast on one side of the ocean and dumped on the other side can harbor...Read more