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Milesort descending Observer Date Summary Photos
20 D Bilderback 03/09/2009 New drift logs distributed on rocks below bluff and numerous small rocks on south beach. Little driftline. Plastic fish container moved onto south beach. Small sticks of wood, duff, Pterygophora stipes and a few kelp/algae in driftline on middle beach. Three small dead Cryptochiton, a few leather Bryozoa, a tunicate, a live Spot-bellied Rock Crab, a live Pink Sea Star and a sponge within 1/2 mile south of Crook Point. Buttercup, Footsteps-of Spring, Trift, Beach Knotweed, and Strawberry blooming on Crook Point. 27 Harbor Seals on offshore rocks. Three Black Oystercatchers and two Canada Geese on offshore rocks. Wind blowing at 3.5 mph from the NW. Small slumps on bluffs. Air and ocean temperature of 46 and 50.5 degrees F, respectively. View full report 22
20 D Bilderback 02/09/2009 Majority of duff seen in January near the point has been removed leaving two small ridges of duff high on beach and two large six-foot high clumps. We would have really wondered what caused these clumps if we hadn't seen the huge wash-up of duff in January! Large patch of accumulated sticks and wood near intertidal area of the point. Light drift on beach with some algae, a few Leather Bryozoa, worm tubes and Hydrozoa. High tides and surf have eroded bluff base in middle of mile and cut into the toe of a landslide. Light drift of duff on the south beach and more sand has been removed, exposing large rocks and stones. Sand removed from North Cove beach. Three Black Oystercatchers, Western Gulls, American Kestril, Black Phoebe, American Pipets, Northern Flicker, Crow and Raven on offshore rocks or headland above beach. 24 Harbor Seals resting on offshore rocks. Wind speed of 4.2 mph from NW. Air and ocean temperature of 64 and 48.4 degrees F, respectively. View full report 9
20 D Bilderback 01/12/2009 We were incredibly surprised to see an extraordinary amount of forest duff (leaves, needles and moss) piled up to a height of 10 to 12 feet on the beach from the headland south to about the middle of Mile 20. We later learned that Curry County experienced very heavy rainfall on December 27 and 28th, 2008 with a record 16 inches in a 48 hour period. Also, there was heavy flooding of the rivers in the area south of Crook Point. We hypothesize that the duff was washed from the forests and sides of the banks of the rivers and was collected by the south-facing beach of Crook Point. The extreme high tides of the year also occurred during this time, making this an exceptional collection point. Sand removed from south beach exposing cobbles and small rocks. Beach slope of 5 degrees. Two large landslides and three smaller slumps of the headland. Run-off from the headland eroded away beach sand. Wood and branches on high beach behind duff. Small amount of algae mixed into the duff. One large live Cryptochiton (Gumboot Chiton) returned to sea. Five noisy Black Oystercathers flying around. 25 Harbor Seals hauled out on their favorite rock. River otter and deer tracks on beach. California Sea Lions heard barking on off-shore rocks. Wind speed of 1.8 mph. Air and ocean temperatures were 62 and 52.5 degrees F, respectively. Low human impact (5)- walking. View full report 22
20 D Bilderback 05/28/2010 No driftline in the north cove. A moderate driftline on the middle beach with a localized heavy concentration near the middle of the beach. The south beach had no driftline. Eighteen species of kelp/algae, Hydrozoa, five Sea Stars, three species of Bryozoa (Flustrellidra, Crisia and Tricellaria), a sponge (Neoesperiopsis), Sea Pork (Aplidium), Stalked Compound Tunicate (Distaplia), worm tubes, Surfgrass (Phyllospadix), small rocks, wood pieces in the driftline. Twenty-four Harbor Seals on offshore rocks. Two California Sea Lions swimming in the bay. Four pair of Black Oystercatchers nesting on offshore rocks. Significant retreat of the bluff of the headland. Sand deposition on South Beach. Boulders and logs at base of northern and southern bluffs. Continued slumping at south headland. The large plastic fish box remains on the south beach. The air and ocean temperatures were 57 and 56 degrees, resprctively. The wind speed was 5.8 mph from SW. No other human activity on the beach. View full report 8
20 D Bilderback 02/02/2010 Ten species of kelp/algae, Hydrozoa, Leather Bryozoa (Flustrellidra spinifera), a sponge (Neoesperiopsis), Sea Pork (Aplidium), small rocks, wood pieces and ocean-based debris in the driftline. Two bags of debris removed from beach. Seventeen Harbor Seals on an offshore rock or swimming in the bay. Two Black Oystercatchers on offshore rock. Canada Geese initially on Saddle Rock but flew to an adjacent rock to the south. Brown Pelicans flying offshore. Retreat of the bluff, landslides and slumps exposing tree roots. Massive sand removal from all beaches (North Cove, Middle Beach and South Beach) exposing boulder fields at base of bluff. The boulder fields were covered with many drift logs. The large plastic fish box has returned to the south beach. The air and ocean temperatures were both 52 degrees. The wind speed was 5.8 mph from SW. No other human activity on the beach. View full report 16
20 D Bilderback 12/03/2009 We saw four crab boats to the west of Crook Point today. A small amount of shells, kelp/algae, Hydrozoa, Bryozoa and tunicates in the driftline. Considerable amounts of wood and logs on beach. High tides and seas reaching and undercutting the headland as well as removing sand and exposing rocks and boulders. Except for an auto tire little human debris on the beach. Plastic fish bin that had been on the beach from summer of 2007 has left the beach. Four Harbor Seals swimming in the bay. Brandt's Cormorant and Brown Pelican flying over ocean. Three Black Oystercathers on offshore rocks. Raven, Song Sparrow, Golden-crowned Kinglet, Yellow-rumped Warbler, Black Phoebe and American Pipit on the beach and headland brush. A Red-tailed Hawk flew over headland. Wind speed of 0.2 mph. Air and ocean temperatures of 55 and 52 degrees, respectively. No human impact on beach. View full report 7
20 D Bilderback 10/01/2009 The southern portion of the mile continues to accumulate sand but lacked any drift. Sand continues to move into the middle portion of the mile (western most point to 2/3 mile southeast of the point) and had areas of heavy accumulations of drift consisting of Seagrass, kelp/algae, wood and a small number of invertebrates. Sand continues to move into the north cove but it was free of drift. Heerman's Gulls, Brown Pelicans and a Western Grebe were in the bay. 31 Harbor Seals on rocks or in bay. Peregrine Falcon flew over headland. Double-crested Cormorant on rocks. River Otter tracks on beach. Dead birds were 2 Brandt's Cormorants, 1 Common Murre and 1 Western Gull. One dead California Sea Lion, reported to the Marine Mammal Stranding Network. 1 skull of rock fish found on beach. Wind speed of 21 mph. Air and ocean temperatures of 59 and 53 degrees F., respectively. Low human impact (0). View full report 11
20 D Bilderback 08/13/2009 Kelp/algae, small rocks, animal casings, wood pieces and cones, a few shells, Leather Bryozoa, Hydrozoa and Sea Pork in the driftline. River Otter tracks on the beach. Steller's and California Sea lions on offshore rocks. Pelagic Cormorants and Hermann's Gulls on the bay. Over 40 Harbor Seals hauled out on rocks or swimming in bay. One dead Common Murre eaten by a raptor. Sand continues to accumulate on south beach and around rocks between south and middle beaches. Two rock bars on each side of stream entering ocean. Wind speed of 16.1 mph. Air and ocean temperatures of 65 and 63 degrees F., respectively. Low human impact (0). View full report 12
20 D Bilderback 07/23/2009 Kelp/algae, animal casings, wood pieces, Leather Bryozoa, Hydrozoa and one Gumboot Chiton in driftline. Two Common Murre and one Brandt's Cormorant dead on beach. Rhinoceros Auklet, Pelagic Cormorant, Pigeon Guillemont, Red-throated Loon, Double-crested Cormorant in bay. Cliff Swallows flying over beach. 45 Harbor Seals in bay and on off-shore rocks. California Sea Lions barking on offshore rocks. Raccoon caught on an offshore rock by this morning's very low tide had to swim back across the bay. Sand continues to accumulate on south beach. Wind speed of 16 mph. Air and ocean temperature of 55 and 54.7 degrees F., respectively. Low human impact (1)-clamming. View full report 11
20 D Bilderback 06/08/2009 Shells, kelp/algae, animal casings, wood pieces, Hydrozoa, Leather Bryozoa in driftline of middle beach. Two dead Common Murre and one dead Cormorant on beach. No drift on south part of the mile. Gray Whale in bay. 15 California Sea Lions and 25 Steller's Sea Lion on offshore rocks. 14 Harbor Seals hauled out on rocks. Notable birds seen were Pigeon Guillemont, Black Oystercatchers, Western Gulls, Brown Pelicans and one Canada Goose. Raccoon tracks on beach. Ocean debris included crab buoys, rubber gloves, yellow glasses, television, a tire and a paint can. Sand moving onshore. Beach slope of 5 degrees. Wind speed 9.1 mph. Air and ocean temperature of 77 and 59 degrees, respectively. Low human impact(0). View full report 8
20 D Bilderback 04/26/2009 We spent time exploring the intertidal invertebrates just south of Saddle Rock during the low tide today (see photos). A few kelp/algae and small rocks in driftline. One portion of the middle beach had forest duff in the driftline. Sand buildup on the south beach. One Canada Goose on south beach. Observed birds were: 5 Black Oystercatchers, Semipalmated Sandpipers, American Kestrel, Common Loon, Western Grebe, Osprey, Brown Pelicans and Pelagic Cormorant. 17 Steller's Sea Lions on off shore rocks. Harbor Seals in bay. Tracks of raccoon on beach. Air and ocean temperatures of 49 and 48.2 degrees F, respectively. Wind speed of 22 mph from NW. Low human impact (0). View full report 13
20 D Bilderback 05/17/2011 The driftline was light on the southern and northern portions of the beach but heavy on the middle portion of the beach with large amounts of kelp/algae and forest duff. The driftline contained 16 kinds of algae/kelp, Hydrozoa, Bryozoa, one Pisaster star, worm tubes, Sea Pork Tunicates and a skate egg case. The rocks washed by high tides were covered with thick mats of Porphyra (Nori/Laver). Black Oystercatchers foraging on offshore rock. Harbor Seals were swimming in bay and hauled out on offshore rocks. Three Turkey Vultures flying over Crook Point. Raccoon and deer tracks on the southern portion of the beach. Large landslides delivered trees to the beach at the southern end of the mile. Large boulders and logs were pressed against the headland of the south beach. Middle beach had some large rocky patches. The wind speed was only 0.7 mph. The air and ocean temperatures were 56 and 52.3 degrees, respectively. Two people on the beach-USFWS personnel. View full report 6
20 D Bilderback 02/10/2011 On the south beach, the driftline was light with small rocks and a few pieces of kelp and surfgrass, Phyllospadix. Large boulders and logs were along the base of the headland. Extensive landslides along the headland has brought down trees and clumps of vegetation. The bluff has retreated, exposing large Marah (Wild Cucumber) storage roots. Ridge/runnel forming on south beach. The limpet, Lottia digitalis, was aggregated on the rocks. On the middle beach, the driftline was more defined with small rocks, small pieces of wood, forest duff (mosses, conifer twigs and leaf litter), a few red-rock crab (Cancer productus) carapaces, a northern kelp crab (Pugettia producta), sponges (Neoesperiopsis), Hydrozoa, two species of bushy Bryozoa (Tricellaria and Scrupocellaria), Leather Bryozoa (Flustrellidra) and the kelp/algae, Pterygophora (Old Growth Kelp), Lessoniopsis (Strap Kelp), Mazzaella (Iridescent Seaweed), Prionitis (Bleach Weed), Callophyllis (Beatiful Leaf Seaweed), and Saccharina (sea Cabbage). The north beach had no driftline but did have boulders and logs against the headland. 92 Harbor Seals were hauled out on the offshore rocks. Two Red-tailed Hawks flying over the headlands. Yellow-rumped Warbler in the bush above beach. Otter and deer tracks on the beach. Wind speed of 3.7 mph from the NW. The air and ocean temperatures were both 54 degrees F. One tire on south beach. Three bags of plastic bottles removed from beach. Fish storage box thrown up high on the side of the south headland by waves. View full report 16
20 D Bilderback 10/20/2010 Don Suva helped us remove five bags (over 130 pounds) of ice plant from the headland rock and upper dune area of the north cove of Crook Point. Ropes and a plastic crab float were removed from the beach. Ice plant that could not be carried out was stored and will be removed at a later time. Light driftline of 13 different species of kelp/algae, Phyllospadix (Sea Grass), wood pieces, rocks, Hydrozoa and Leather Bryozoa (Flustrellidra) and ocean-based debris consisting of two fish storage bins, five fishing floats and several pieces of plastic. Two Harbor Seals swimming in bay. Two adult Black Oystercatchers with their chick in the north cove. An additional pair of adult Black Oystercatchers along the south side of Crook Point. Western Gulls and two Heermann's Gulls on the beach. Flocks of Canada Geese flying south over ocean. One Black Phoebe on the high beach and one Red Shouldered Hawk flying over the headland. Dead birds included four Common Murre and two Western Gulls. Two dead male California Seal Lions, one juvenile, one adult reported to the Oregon Marine Mammal Stranding Network. Sand buildup on the south beach over rocks and logs. Two pink Sand Verbena growing on beach. Air and ocean temperatures of 52 and 53 degrees, respectively. Wind speed of 12.3 mph from the SW. No other people on thr beach. View full report 11
20 D Bilderback 07/13/2010 We spent the early morning hours exploring the intertidal area during this low tide. Please see the photos for some of the interesting animals and algae that were found. Sixty-five Harbor Seals on rocks and in the bay. Five Black Oystercatchers on north rock. Flock of Hermann's Gulls with California Gulls and a single Black-bellied Plover on the south beach. Double Crested Cormorant, Brown Pelicans, Caspian Terns, Ring-billed Gulls, Canada Geese and an Osprey flying over the bay. About 50 yards of a heavy drift on the middle beach. Patches of kelp in the driftline of the south beach. Nineteen species of kelp/algae, two dead crabs, Leather Bryozoan (Flustrellidra spinifera)and Surfgrass (Phyllospadix) in the driftline. Sand accretion on the south beach. Twenty-two surf balls on the high beach. Fish box remains on the beach. Air and ocean temperature of 60 and 50.9 degrees F., respectively. Wind speed of 9 mph.from the Northwest. View full report 14
20 D Bilderback 05/17/2012 Light driftline with 12 different genera of kelp and algae, terrestrial mosses, Leather Bryozoa (Flustrellidra corniculata), the flowering plant, Phyllospadix (Seagrass) and small rocks. Notable wildlife included one Peregrine Falcon, 10 Brown Pelicans, one Pacific Loon, 13 Harbor Seals in south bay and hauled out on offshore rocks, seven Canada Geese, four flocks of Whimbrels fying north over ocean, one Red-tailed Hawk, two Steller's and one California Seal Lions, four pairs of Black Oystercatchers, One Spotted Sandpiper and Surf Scoters in bay. The large fish box remains on the south beach while a large black float and wood pallet appeared on the north headland beach. On south beach, low sand exposed large cobbles with drift logs on top of the rocks. Sand was moving onshore. Major landslide brought a large tree to the beach. The sky was clear and sunny. Air and ocean temperatures of 57 and 53 degrees F, respectfully. Wind speed was 10.5 mph from the NW. View full report 10
20 D Bilderback 01/28/2011 The north cove had little or no driftline, and sand had been removed exposing large rocks at the base of the bluff. Large drift logs rested on the rocks. The driftline had a large amount of terrestrial duff of moss and leaf litter. A major landslide had slumped into the cove. The driftline of the middle beach consisted of a large amount of terrestrial duff of moss and leaf litter mixed with 14 different types of kelp and algae. The invertebrates were Leather Bryozoa(Flustrellidra), Clubbed Compound Tunicate (Distaplia), Sea Pork (Aplidium), worm tubes and Green False Jingle Shell(Pododesmus). The bluff had slumped at several places carrying down soil, rocks, vegetation and trees onto the beach. The south beach had no driftline, and sand had been removed exposing rocks at the base of the bluff. Large drift logs were on the rocks. 75 Harbor seals hauled out on the offshore rocks or swimming in the bay. 17 Steller's and 5 California Sea Lions on an offshore rock. 30 cormorants resting on rocks. A Double-Crested Cormorant flew over bay. 6 Black Oystercatchers on rocks. 47 Raven on northern beach. 70 Common Murre on ocean. 200 Canada Geese flying north. Loons on the ocean. White-Winged Scoter on bay. 2 Red-Tailed Hawks flying over beach. Yellow-Rumped Warblers on slope above beach. The ocean and air tempertures were 52.4 and 62 degrees, respectively. The was no wind on the beach. View full report 12
20 D Bilderback 09/07/2011 Three boats seen drifting very close to offshore rocks. Except for two deflated party balloons the north cove beach lacked a driftline. Sand had accumulated in the cove. Five Black Oystercatchers on northern rocks or flying over the bay. Yellow Sandverbena blooming along the west headland and middle beach area. Middle beach had a moderate to heavy driftline of 27 different genera of kelp/algae and Eelgrass and Surfgrass. The older drift was buried. Driftline invertebrates were Sea Pork Tunicate, Clubbed Compound Tunicate, Northern Kelp Crab, Red Rock Crab, Dungeness Crab; Spiny Leather Bryozoan, Bushy Bryozoan, and Bread Crumb Sponge. Forty Harbor Seals hauled out on a rock and several swimming in the bay. A flock of 14 Whimbrel and three Wandering Tattler on the beach. A red-shouldered Hawk, Red-tailed Hawk, Northern Harrier, Osprey, and Peregrine Falcon flying over the beach. Flocks of Double-crested Cormorants and Brown Pelican flying north. A Herrmann's Gull on a offshore rock. Tracks of deer, raccoon and river otter on the beach. One dead headless Common Murre and bones of a large Sea Lion. Wind speed of 2.2 mph. Air and ocean temperature of 56 and 54.7 degrees F, respectively. View full report 14
20 D Bilderback 07/28/2011 The south beach lacked driftline and sand has accumulated around the drift logs and over the large rocks at the base of the headland. The middle beach had two areas of heavy drift consisting of kelp and algae, some Leather Bryozoa (Flustrellidra)and 1 dead Pisaster (Sea Star) . The north cove beach had no drift. Four River Otter swimming in the bay. 55 Harbor Seals hauled out on the rocks or swimming in the bay. Flocks of Brown Pelicans flying north. Pied-Billed Grebe on the ocean. 15 immature Western Gulls on the beach. View full report 8
20 D Bilderback 03/08/2013 The driftline was absent except for two localized areas with terrestrial-derived leaves, mosses, wood pieces, some shredded blades of Pterygophora(Old Growth Kelp) and a few invertebrates and other algae and kelp. 65 Harbor Seals resting on offshore rocks, two Peregrine, one Brandt's Cormorant, and three Brown Pelicans flying north over the ocean. Two Black Oystercathers. Beach was flat with drift logs on cobbles at the base of the bluff in the north cove and on south beach. Visible erosion of the bluffs. Fish box remains on the south beach. The wind speed was 18.4 mph from the NW. The air and ocean temperatures were 49 and 48 degrees, respectively. No other people were on the beach. View full report 5
20 D Bilderback 12/09/2012 Peregrine Falcon resting on south end of Saddle Rock. Flock of Red Crossbills, Black Phoebe, 26 Ring-billed Gulls, Evening Grossbeak, a flock of Pine Siskins & Bewick's Wren on beach. A pair of Black Oystercatchers each on Seal Rock and south beach. American Kestrel & Red-tailed Hawk flying over the beach. 46 Harbor seals on rocks in the bay. One dead Western Grebe. Some new drift logs added to but not much sand removed from north cove. Middle beach had a heavy deposition of forest duff with small amount of kelp/algae. Few invertebrates in driftline. Sand removed by run off and high seas leaving an eroded sand cliff. New drift logs on high beach. A small amount of Styrofoam and plastic bottles on the beach. Sand isthmus connecting offshore island covering rocky kelp beds. Large amounts of sand removed from south beach exposing large rocks and cobbles. New drift logs and large fish box on the cobbles. Air and ocean temperatues of 56 and 53.5 degrees F., respectively. Wind speed of 7.8 mph from the NW. View full report 19
20 D Bilderback 05/15/2013 Except for one small heavy patch of drift, the driftline was sparse with kelp/algae, Leather Bryozoa and crab carapaces. 25 Harbor Seals swimming in bay or hauled out on offshore rocks, Canada Geese flying north over ocean, Brandt's Cormorants nesting on offshore rock, A Raven nesting on a offshore rock, Pigeon guillemot swimming on the water and Seven Black Oystercatchers standing on rocks, two pair of which were nesting. Beach was flat with little slope to the ocean. Wind speed was 7.8 mph. The air and ocean temperatures were 53 and 52 degrees F., respectively. View full report 0
20 D Bilderback 01/13/2015 One person and two dogs were seen on the beach. We saw over 60 Harbour Seals and 5 whales in the near shore ocean. Black Oystercatchers, Western Gulls and Mew Gulls were heard and seen on and near the beach. Otter, raccoon and deer tracks were seen on the beach. One dead California Sea Lion, a dead Pacific Loon and the brain case of a Cormorant were found on the beach. The south headland has taken a beating from the ocean in the winter’s high wave and storm events with obvious rock and headland slumping. Close to the western headland, there were piles of “terrestrial duff” that was mixed with sand. These piles had been moved on the beach and then eroded again by the high waves. Moss pieces were in much of the driftline along the south beach. Algae, shells, tunicate, bryozoa, eel grass, and feather duster worm casings were also in the driftline. Ocean temperature was 54.8 F. View full report 8
21 Don Hayes 08/22/2007 I visually scan the entire coast mile daily and walk, run, and swim there regularily. Also I make photos from time to time. I do see an occassional dead bird or seal as well as plastic drifting in. Of concern is horse manure in the upper Pistol basin that I swim in as it appears to cause weedy growth. There have not been off road vehicles as in the past. This area offers a dramatic splendid beach hike. More detailed reports and photos will be included in future reports. View full report 0
21 Don Hayes 07/01/2009 A pleasant day for a beach walk, run, swim, stretch, and report including 70 photo study. Nothing unusual to note except no one on entire beach or in lot and small seal seeming not in best of health with ribs showing and skin splatches."What an incredibly beautiful beach! kind regards, Don Hayes View full report 1
21 PaulSherman 05/03/2014 The starfish we had seen dead and washed-up near pistol river / ocean coast line had disappeared --probably washed back into sea.As we walked mile 21, we observed hundreds of mole crab exuviae! Their molt had to have taken place within last 4-5 days, as the exuviae were not present on 28 April. Interestingly, the hundreds of shed exoskeletons coincided with a new moon phase, suggesting that the mole crab synchronized their molt with the nocturnally darkest period, perhaps to ensure they could be protected while actively shedding their exoskeleton. It was a very striking event! The only other activity on the beach were gulls bathing. We did see a pair of oystercatchers feeding in the tide pools. No disturbances were made. View full report 0
21 PaulSherman 04/18/2014 DISPATCH Mrs. Peregrine Strikes AgainUpon our arrival, we observed the resident Peregrine pair on the dunes just adjacent to the Pistol River mouth. The male had just arrived, scaring up about 20 gulls bathing in the river estuary. He landed on top of his mate, attempting a brief copulation ( View full report 0
21 PaulSherman 04/05/2014 The migratory eagles we observed over the Pistol River did appear to bother gulls that typically bath in the Pistol river estuary. We saw three to four harbor seals in the river confluence with the ocean, offshore. There was a great deal of small rock wash up and quite a few whole endoskeletons of sand dollars. At the 1/2 mi area we spied a blown out 24 inch truck tire near the low tide mark and a crab trap that had been carried to near the high tide water mark. Just an 1/8 mi further we rediscovered the broken fiberglass hull of a boat. It had no markings to indicate its origin. At the end of our mi another eagle perched near a dead raven as we approached. He (she) remained near its carrion even though we'd disturbed the vulture party. Mr. Eagle finally flew off, greatly disturbing a pair of black oystercatchers and several herring gulls that have begun setting up nests off the crook point rocks. Much kelp (bull whip) had washed ashore. The sand levels at the end of mi 21 seemed much lower than last visit, perhaps reamed out by the previous storm. There was evidence of deeper tide pools. We observed many mussels, barnacles, chiton, anemones and starfish, and some very shy blennies (I think) in the tide pools. I searched for isopods, but they've not yet returned. We examined two snail shells (one with an occupant). Plant life seemed much more lush, with some blooming shore lupine, ice plants, wild strawberries. The storms and warmer whether have brought on the spring and bird nesting. View full report 7
21 PaulSherman 03/07/2014 We came upon the widened mouth of the Pistol River after many days of rain, and saw the area strangely absent of bathing gulls. Three Ravens were hawking, and a Peregrine dive bombed them then landed on a driftwood stump. We soon discovered why Ms. Peregrine stayed in the area: She and her mate had just made a Kill of a large Herring gull. We stood back several feet, and soon both landed to finish plucking their kill. I clicked my camera, daring not to get much closer, as Ms. Peregrine wanted to take the kill up into the air (and surely she'd lose it in the drink of the river). Her mate flew across the river and watched me from afar (as did the three hungry Ravens). After an hour walk to the end of mile 21 and back again, the pair of Peregrines were still defending some of the remains of the Herring Gull. View full report 3
21 PaulSherman 01/17/2014 We removed a minor amount of washed up "Oregon" debris and left a rubber tire that had washed up near end of mi 21-20 (rolled up to sand dune base). American made, Kelly Titanium, size R275-16We were happy to see Harbor Seals returning to the mouth of the Pistol, and much more bird activity at mouth (bathing).Bridge construction activity is waning, as crew is preparing to dismantle catwalk and finish cementing guard rails.River level seemed much higher due to last week's rains. Steelhead sighting was expected, and pleasant to see. View full report 0
21 Bob Ivey 01/04/2014 Did some additional research about the area. There is a proposal for a golf couse which would include beach access farther down the coast, where was once a commercial salmon hatchery operated, Burned Hill. I would like to walk the point at minus tide this spring, I'll alway remember Crook Point, it was beautiful. View full report 3
21 PaulSherman 10/27/2019

It was a beautiful sunny, warm windy day.  I walked south along the beach all the way to the massive rocks at the boundary of the USFWS refuge at Crook Point.  The tide was low (-0.4) and the exposed rocks were covered with massive populations of acorn and gooseneck barnacles, bay and surf mussels, and green anemones; sea palms and other algae were scattered amongst the animal life.  The highlight for me was seeing that the sea star population has rebounded in this area.  In 1/2 hour I counted 87 ochre stars, mostly orange-colored, with a few purple-colored individuals interspersed.  In terms of avifauna, I saw 2 pairs of oystercatchers, 3 turkey vultures, multiple western gulls, and a peregrine falcon. Regarding mammals, I saw a harbor sea just beyond the breakers, and tracks of grey foxes along with their excavations were visible above the tide line.

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21 PaulSherman 01/30/2020 View full report 0
21 PaulSherman 05/08/2020

All was well on Mile 21 in the early morning of 8 May on a very low tide (-1.5).  An apparently orphaned Harbor Seal pup was observed on the beach in the cove at the southernmost end of Mile 21.  It crawled safely back to the ocean.

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21 PaulSherman 07/23/2020

No violations  or unusual environmental damage noted.  Healthy sea star population and flock of brown pelicans observed.

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21 PaulSherman 07/25/2021 View full report 0
21 PaulSherman 09/11/2022

I saw 2 coyotes, 1 grey fox, and 5 brown pelicans, in addition to many western gulls.

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22 KenBax 08/12/2008 The Pistol River remains closed from the ocean. A large number of pelicans and gulls mingled with a few cormorants seem to be 'headquartering' at the lake feature that accumulates just past the bridge when the river is blocked. Photos will be uploaded later. View full report 0
22 Muriah 01/28/2012 This "hotspot" for international windsurfing competition in the summertime,the Pistol River Wave Bash is nearly abandoned now and there was no one else to see the sunset from there tonight ... except Snazzy dog. There were plenty of footprints, showing and interest in the decade old two-story driftwood condo that is half gone from Pistol River mouth moving northward, cutting away all of the beach from the west side of Henry Rock and traveling as far north as Windsurfer Rock where the judges and spectators gather to watch the competition, further north than it has been in the lifetime of local residents, it is said. I have seen a photo in an old photobook showing Pistol River mouth coming around the north end of Henry Rock from the east side, but it didn't go as far north as it has lately.It is prevented from returning to that course by a buildup of dunes, secured by sandgrass, against the north end of "The Rock."Right now the appearance is of major change, but by the next windsurfing competition, it may look fairly normalized. Right now there is a sheer cliff of sand where the river cut away and invited in the ocean.A great amount of driftwood has been deposited to the north of Windsurfer Rock, probably mostly from the first batch brought in by the storm just after Thanksgiving, and by the second one just before New Years and the last one that climaxed on Wednesday, January 18, with more than 8", and by the time it stopped had dumped more than 18" here.The driftline today had only woody matter.The motivation for filing this report is something that I had never seen or heard of before, a bird apparently died because it could neither swallow nor eject the spiny rockfish that it had caught.See the posted photo and remark on it, please.Thanks.Mureen View full report 8
22 Volunteer Trainer 04/15/2016

The information and photo are from John Chapman at HMSC. He was able to scrape some of the animals off the boat. Many live specimens. A reminder that we are still getting tsunami debris with live organisms. Please keep a look out and call me if you have any questions. None are silly. We are all continuing to contribute to this very important data base. Fawn 541.270 0027

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22 Lavenne22 04/09/2021

Overall clean, windswept beach with lots of massive driftwood and notable dune erosion. Observed Buffleheads on river as well as two Caspian Terns at the mouth of the river. Saw two seals at mouth of river. Given the freshwater access and the shelter of dunes and driftwood, I find myself curious about all the wildlife I did not see in this rich habitat.  There were lots of animal tracks but they were indistinct and windblown. 

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22 Lavenne22 04/12/2021

Flock of Buffleheads on the river. Observed approximately 15 Caspian Terns in flight. ( I saw two standing at the river mouth 3 days ago). Many gulls, one seal, and one dead bird-- wings only. Matching wings,three feet apart. Dark brown feathers. About the size of crow wings.

Party of 5 horseback riders. One windsurfer in water, 2 in parking lot.

Some human footprints, light traffic, through dunes and back towards river bend and main channel of river. High tide, not much beach to walk on. 

Observed what looked like possible current or former animal dens dug into the mud bank along the east shore of the river bend that parallels the highway. I viewed with binoculars. One appeared to be about 1foot tall at the opening, tapering back. The other was about 1/3 that size. 

The landmark rock is oozing water and growing moss, slime, ferns, grass, weeds, rock plants, and flowers that look like yellow snapdragons. 

When I arrived at the parking area I scanned the east side of the rock with binoculars, to look for nests or birds. I saw neither. ( I am not a skilled birder, so I could have overlooked something). 

(Will add photos after publication. Poor connectivity where I am.)

 

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23 Bob Harvey 09/09/2007 My first trip, so information is baseline for me. Very little litter , lots of driftwood, few people. No facilities except a portapotty at S end. Many rocks, monoliths seastacks in the sandy beach and in the ocean. Too foggy to see much of those just off shore. Some support small vegetation (no trees) on top. View full report 1
23 Bob Harvey 03/12/2008 Low tide, overcast. Heavy dune erosion, exposed driftwood. People and dogs using beach even though it's midweek. Marine gardens exposed but not easy to get to because guarded by slippery rocks. Geese nesting atop rocks. Little litter. No dead birds or mammals. View full report 3
23 Bob Harvey 12/18/2007 Weather relented for the 2 hours neede to walk the beach; no dead birds, not much litter. High tide is almost upon us so some areas are inaccesible, esp. the cave in a monolith at N part of the mile. Meyers Creek is 35-40 feet wide at narrowest point as it crosses sand. We were presented with a stunning sunset. Fine trip. View full report 2
23 Bob Harvey 12/04/2008 A calm fall has produced few big storms so little new erosion is evident. The tide was a +3 ft so the tidepools were unavailable for inspecting. An interesting artifact comprised of logs and bolts is new (see first picture). View full report 3
23 Bob Harvey 03/18/2009 Seven people (ok 10 counting my group), walking the beach, some with dogs, at low tide. Seasonal creeks running. Very little debris of any kind on beach.Wildlife: a few gulls and 4 oystercatchers (first sighting in my 1 1/2 yr watch). and 1 osprey. No geese as there were 1 year ago.No man made changes. Storm erosion has cut a sand bank back a few feet since Dec. View full report 0
23 Bob Harvey 05/06/2010 Beautiful day; wind has created many pebble-caused "sand shadows". The marine gardens were inaccessible, tide too high. The driftline composition was interesting, details at the limit of my vision. Perhaps this is krill(?).I spooked the 2 rabbits in the brush as I examined the blooming wild irises and the blooming wild strawberries. And interesting to see such a change in the dune front since December's verticality to May's gentle slopes. View full report 2
23 Bob Harvey 12/09/2009 Cool, sunny fine day, Inland has overnight temps in teens, so 40's are balmy here. A few walkers, offshore commercial boats. Little man-made litter. Grass-covered dunes continue to be chewed away by the sea.The summer's bridge refurbishing is all but finished. View full report 3
23 Bob Harvey 07/31/2009 My stop was brief; I walked just in the vicinity of Myers Crk where repaving and some reconstruction was underway. It's being conducted with care. Beach plants were flowering. Wrack line held clumps of large mussels. Saw my first GBH here. Foggy to the south and at sea. View full report 0
23 Bob Harvey 01/05/2011 About a dozen people enjoying mild winter day on beach. Playing, walking, photographing. Driftline has much more and much larger woody debris than usual. Steep winter cut on dune faces is beginning. Wet sand high on foredune indicates recent high tide, maybe storm. Oddest thing: man repeatedly throwing net across Myers Creek at its narrowest point (about 4 ft) on beach, just before the water fanned out. No catch apparent. As we approach, he stuffs his net into a backpack and walks away. Thirty minutes later I hail a passing highway patrolman, and report what we saw. The officer asked for a description of the fisherman and said he would report to ODFW. We enjoyed a surprisingly beautiful sunset from the N end of mile 23. View full report 0
23 Bob Harvey 09/08/2010 A fine drizzly day on mile 23. Always interesting to see winter-summer changes in dunescape. One treat was the finding of a cold (terrestrial) Pacific ringneck snake on the beach at base of monolith. Another was the quite low tide revealing more seastars etc than I'm used to seeing, as well as a cave facing seaward usually inaccessible. Approx. 2 sq. ft. patch of mussels missing from musselbeds, cause unknown. Almost no trash. View full report 2
23 Bob Harvey 04/13/2012 The season's storms have changed things. Large amounts of driftwood lodged on the N. side of Henry's Rock (at the southmost point of mile 23)have disappeared. Huge quantities of wood now line the beach 3/4 way to Myers Creek. Minor amount of trash except for large tub. View full report 5
23 Bob Harvey 10/11/2011 Note: Pistol River (mile 22) has breached its beachy prison and loses itself in the Pacific. The agitated surf has provided us with haze-softened vistas. Today only 5 people present. Walking and one taking pictures. (A reliable source visited "my" mile Aug 23, and found about 16 people enjoying kite boarding.) Driftline contains quite a few tangled clumps of kelp, providing feasting for myriads of sand fleas. 9 dead birds, gulls I think, lie here and there. The beach has been greatly smoothed by summer's sand deposition. Most of July's interesting dunes are gone. A fair amount of driftwood appears to have been recently cut. View full report 1
23 Muriah 08/06/2011 Special Baby Dolphin report View full report 1
23 Bob Harvey 07/13/2011 My apologies for shirking my March and June reports.I spent the low May and June tides on the Clatsop beaches in search of the wiley razor clam. Yes I got 'em. I do recall having success razor clamming on Myers Creek beach in 1983, but a year later got but one. I've not tried again.The good news is no inappropriate changes occur on this beach. Summer dunes have replaced sand lost in winter, flowers bloom on the highway slopes, passing traffic stops for easy access to a gorgeous beach with scenic rock outcrops on and off-shore. South end has quantities of driftwood suitable for "fort" building.About 20 people and 4 dogs were using the beach in joyful ways. No human damage,no litter, no problems. Wildlife was a few gulls and crows. View full report 2
23 Bob Harvey 07/26/2013 Wonderful day, more people than I've seen before. Summer smoothing of sand, burying of driftwood. One dead murrelet.For videos of mile 23 click the following links: Low Tide VideoandKing High Tide Video View full report 2
23 Bob Harvey 05/07/2013 Mild , cloudy day. More people than usual, but still only nine. Natural summer sand deposition is well under way. The tide is low enough to allow access to the small marine garden near the hollow (about 50 feet deep horizontally) in the monolith in the group of monoliths near north end of Mile 23. View full report 0
23 Bob Harvey 12/13/2012 My visits are usually timed for low tide; today is a very high tide (king). Everything is quite different, actual beach is scarce because it's underwater, walking is only safe at base of dunes or on dunes or thru high driftwood piles. The ungrassed foredunes are under seige by the waves; large amounts of formerly buried wood is revealed, some still jutting from the wave-cut dune fronts.In April 2012 I reported a 4'x6' green plastic tub to Harris Beach State Park to be removed. It is still there, sand filled. View full report 6
23 Bob Harvey 09/06/2012 Foggy day, very little use. More dead birds than usual; remains vary from skeletal to full-bodied.A small pocket of crescent dunes was observed.Trash: 1 auto tire, which I removed to Harris Beach S.P. dumpster. In April I found a green tub which I reported to HBSP for removal. It is still there, most buried by sand. View full report 1
23 [email protected] 07/02/2014 The beach is definitely getting more visitors but doesn't seem much the worse for it. A little more trash but still not much of a problem. Not a place for solitude. Sea star population seems to be unaffected by wasting disease. Usual number of dead birds. Sand Dollar population appears to be declining. I think this is one of the most scenic sections of the Oregon Coast and remains my favorite View full report 10
23 Bob Harvey 06/29/2014 Strong N. wind , beautiful day. Unusual :(1) dead rotting seal pup(2)1 large remnant of fiberglass boat , partly buried in dry dunes (3) sea stars possibly suffering from wasting. Only a total of 2 dozen visible about 1.5 hrs after a -1 tide.I will contact tsunami debris group. View full report 10
23 Bob Harvey 02/02/2014 I have been remiss...last visit was July. Seasonal changes include loss of large summer sand ramp at southmost beach monolith; lengthy steep wavecut bank parallel to ocean with great quantities of large and small driftwood ,some of it (at least ) freed from interment in sand. At N end, Myers Creek's outlet has moved north against base of highway 101 riprap, around an on-beach monolith, then out to sea.About two hours before Your Reporter was there, a very high tide of 7.2 had crested. View full report 5
23 Bob Harvey 10/02/2015 A few people: one windsurfer on beach , 4 walkers and a photographer. Driftline has small (1/2 inch) crustacean shells about, some kelp, a few mussels.Summer sand deposits have covered winter cut banks, new shallow embayment at north end. One dead pinniped, probably a seal, rather fresh , near Myers Creek. View full report 0
23 Bob Harvey 04/21/2015 I inspected my Mile 23 at low tide on Tuesday the 21st. I have never been there when the tide was so low , about negative 1.3. The first thing I learned is that the marine gardens there are far more extensive than I ever knew before. Most are rock faces and are surrounded by deep water so are not accessible for close inspection without boots. I did not have boots. There are more than a hundred sea stars evident, and the handful that I could get close to all seem healthy. The diseased ones I could see last year are gone. In the same nearby and approachable area are only healthy sea stars both ochre and red. I was excited at what I saw. This was not a scientifically conducted inspection. View full report 2
23 Bob Harvey 12/20/2014 DISPATCH Sat morning Dec 20 about 11 am. A spectacular storm is in progress and it is high tide, about 9.3. Close enough to a King Tide I think. pictures from miles 24, 23, 22 from highway 101 pull outs View full report 5
23 Bob Harvey 12/18/2014 The large storm of one week ago has cut steep dune fronts from S to N. I have not seen steep dune cuts in the rock sheltered N part of the mile before.Unusual amount of small fragments of hard plastic litter.I dead cormorant.Unable to visit marine garden, storm ruins low tide. I cannot visit suffering seastars View full report 5
23 Bob Harvey 11/15/2014 The marine gardens are inaccessible so no view of sea stars. 3 quite decomposed sea birds. Garbage bag full of trash, mostly rope and mostly from within driftwood and lowest dunes. Trash looks local. There is no Tsunami Waste drop-off S of Coos Bay. Fawn is looking into this issue. View full report 0
23 Bob Harvey 01/10/2016

Nothing but footprints on the beach--no trash, and nothing at all in the driftline.

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23 Bob Harvey 03/22/2016

At low tide, almost 40 people were using the beach most of them walking. Three dogs. It is spring break so this is heavy usage for this spot. The grassy foredunes have been further eroded since January. In the southern part of the mile the Dune is eroded to the backside downslope of the former dune. In January this beach was devoid of litter. today there is a great deal of plastic litter dominated by two and one-half black plastic floats, encrusted on one side with sea life and including many other smaller plastic fragments. Almost all was retrieved by us.

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23 Bob Harvey 08/08/2016

Şummer sands have been stacked against (but not to the top of) last winters badly eroded dunes. The beach itself has interesting sand features such as crescent dunes. In the north part of the mile, the beach is protected by large offshore monoliths, so less sand is deposited. A large bed of driftwood remains unburied.

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23 Bob Harvey 12/16/2016

Sunny cool, clear day with calm surf. Summer's sand deposits eg ramps and crescent dunes are gone ; no new winter erosion of dunes. Large amounts of woody debris in driftline.When high tide is reached, the northern one forth mi of beach will be impassable. 

 

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23 Bob Harvey 12/16/2016 DISPATCH View full report 2
23 Bob Harvey 05/04/2017

A muted day, thin fog drifting ashore. Summer sand piling against steep dune fronts. Scattered trees' debris esp on South end of mile. Marine gardens briefly accessed, but we feel are our reward.   East side of 101 has some large areas of rock placement by ODOT for bank stabilization. 3 dozen gulls at mouth of Myers Creek.

 

 

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23 Bob Harvey 03/07/2018

The vegetative foredune all along mile 23 continue to recede as evidenced by fallen clumps of dune grass in front of the dunes.   A few starfish are evident on the rocks. Driftwood is being cut and and perhaps removed. Trash is limited to one pickup bed liner partly buried in the sand.

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23 Bob Harvey 06/28/2018

I walked and was blown from north to south on this very windy day, and was very nearly deposited on the Dune  myself. the wind was strong enough to pick up chunks of still wet sand and blow it! Virtually no trash present except one tire. A new informational sign on petrels has been erected on a parking area on 101.   One on shore rock on the south end of the mile usually has a sand ramp on its south side in the summer but as yet does not.

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23 Bob Harvey 10/12/2018

People enjoying Beach, foredunes stacked with summer sand from the northwest. New signage along Highway 101 such as "no overnight parking", yellow safety location signs 183,184,185

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23 Bob Harvey 12/07/2017

Pyrosomes... In the 10 years I have monitored this beach I have never seen these before.    

Summer sand deposits are mostly intact,  few steep dune faces

Myers Creek is flowing strongly and directly into the ocean 

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23 Bob Harvey 11/07/2017

Pyrosomes... In the 10 years I have monitored this beach I have never seen these before.    

Summer sand deposits are mostly intact,  few steep dune faces

Myers Creek is flowing strongly and directly into the ocean 

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23 Bob Harvey 01/25/2019

Since my October visit, large amounts of vegetated foredune has occurred along about 90% of Mile 23. The south end has escaped it. Up to as much as 30 feet of foredune has been lost especially in the region around the yellow location sign number 184. Much of  large pile of driftwood that has accumulated on the beach that is protected by the  huge offshore rocks has been re-distributed north and south of it's original spot.

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23 Bob Harvey 05/01/2019

The tide was low enough to allow access to the more distant monolith with a cave and marine garden nearby. Lots of anemones and 3 seastars.

 

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23 Bob Harvey 09/02/2019

Shocker sound deposition is normal. Unusual to see two people surfing. Very unusual to find a decomposing seal. Very unusual to find a few dozen small desiccated jellies and one big one. Unidentified Critter on ceiling normally inaccessible cave.

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23 Bob Harvey 02/01/2020

Lots of plastic ocean deposited plastic this time of year.  Foredunes continue to lose sand and grass esp N end of mile.

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23 Bob Harvey 02/09/2021

Well used beach today..9 people and lots of footprints since the last high tide ~6hours ago. The loss of foredunes as evidenced by clumps of sand and dune grass lying along base of remaining dunes. The marine garden on the monoliths at north end of the mile are rich in healthy orange seastars and purple seastars visible below the mussel beds and within the anemone beds. Lots of large woody debris high on the beach.

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23 Lavenne22 04/09/2021 DISPATCH

Parked here to walk Mile 22. There is an animal carcass in the parking lot. It has been there at least a week. (I was not on CW last week). When I first saw it, it appeared to have horns like a goat. It looked like all skin and bones, no flesh. It still smelled terrible. This week it has deteriorated considerably, been further nibbled, and lost the strong smell. At the south end of the parking area, there is a bird wing. Along the path to the beach, there is toilet paper, socks, a maxi pad. I foolishly forgot to bring gloves, so I did not pick these items up. On the beach, heading south, I found bird remains wedged in the large rock formation with the pointy top.

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23 Bob Harvey 05/10/2021

Illegal ATV tracks recently made running from south to north and back again. Sand has been deposited against the formerly steep foredunes.  The low tide was too high to allow access of the marine gardens. The dune grass has not turned greener yet.

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23 Bob Harvey 07/13/2021

1 dead murre.  Low tide reveals mussel and seastar beds. Small temporary dunes have formed. Dune grasses have greened since May. Very clear day....happy people

 

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23 Bob Harvey 11/30/2021

The tallest dunes (~10ft) are being eroded as they are each year. Clumps of dune grass has slid down dune face. See pic.

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23 Bob Harvey 01/18/2022

1. Vegetated foredunes continue to erode...evident the entire mile.

2. The bits of plastic in wrack line show up this time of year, then disappear by my next visit.

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23 Bob Harvey 08/03/2022

The cave in one of the monoliths was accessible. The modest exposed marine garden in front of the cave has repopulated with seastars, two of them being very large. The die-off of a few years ago had killed all in that area. This is is a non-scientific opinion as I have no actual counts to present.

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23 Botermans 01/25/2023

There was a lot of small plastic debris and natural tree debris along the tide line between Meyers Creek and a short distance south of the stacks.  There are more beach rocks exposed by the stacks due to removal of the sand by the waves - see pics.  There is more driftwood and it is pushed up against the sand dunes and in some places up and over the sand bluff - see pics. We walked the beach south of Pistol River Middle access last week before the King tides and there was larger debris, i.e. sand bucket, plastic cups, boat rope, etc. and a lot more driftwood.  The Pistol River estuary was full of wood; it looked like a mill pond.

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23 Bob Harvey 01/23/2023

Steep newly cut foredunes and rocks more exposed because of winter waves scouring the beach. 

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24 Muriah 08/04/2008 It is such a pleasure every day to see so many people enjoying the beach near Pistol River and Cape Sebastian.And it wonderful that they leave nothing but footprints. Even with all the dogs enjoying the romp at the shoreline. Still no evidence afterwards. View full report 2
24 edbear 07/27/2008 Many, Many Small Crab shells on beachat tide line. Could be a Dead Zoneproblem?? Shell deposits are probablyonly 1-2 months old at most. View full report 0
24 Muriah 01/01/2009 The beach trekkers have been amazingly appreciative and respectful. It would be good to do something to help prevent the blow-off from the parkinglot to the beach, if only a sign for starters.I have prepared a Power Point Presentation of CoastWatch Mile 24, entitled "Cape Cove Rocks!"I occasionally add to the images of the rocks and seastacks and lighting features of the laymans version. Eventually I intended to get together with a geologists for the technical upgrade. View full report 3
24 Muriah 12/12/2011 The main event of this season so far is the first major storm of the season that ended just before Thanksgiving. It swept the beach clean and smooth, removing the windblown sandhills of summer and the debris from brush clearing that had been dumped over the cliff parking lot and most of the uprooted trees that were at the base of the eroding cliffs. The high seas delivered very little debris, mainly a few quite large logs which were shoved tidily up against the bank. The sand is lower near the parking lot, as evidenced by "Brain Rock" the sand-o-meter, and higher at the cusp of the cape, as evidenced by the burial of most of the small rocky ridges that usually protrude several inches above the sand there.Despite the strong wind, high tide and huge breakers, there was very little sign of marine life damage evidenced on the beach. View full report 3
24 Muriah 06/08/2011 A Pair of Oystercatchers were in the edge of the surf at Indian Head Rock, just north of Myers Creek. The first, and only, time I have seen such birds on this mile. They seemed exhausted. They noted the dog and then relaxed and one squatted on the sand and after a minute or so the other squatted in the wet sand and they remained like that as the dog moved past them. I see that 4 of these birds were spotted for the first time just south of Meyers Creek. View full report 1
24 Lavenne22 04/08/2021 DISPATCH

Extremely low tide. Saw two orange sea stars on different rocks/different pools. One looked sick: pale orange and shriveled. The other appeared healthier: plumper and brighter. 

Saw a lone goose at the mouth of Meyer's Creek, dipping its beak into the sand shorebird-style. I looked at it form a distance with binocluars. Definitely Canada Goose. Noteable becasue I observed a lone goose two days ago at Ophir State beach. 

Very windy. Did not observe any wildlife except gulls.

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26 [email protected] 02/26/2009 Fair amounts of garbage, mostly recycleables. 4 Tires and half of a 50 gallon metal drum. I relieved the beach of a two gallon bucket full of plastic and glass and 1 tire. Not a lot of people on this stretch. View full report 0
26 hobbins 01/07/2021

Beach was clean for the most part. Only two people on the beach.

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